A comedian exaggerates what he gives and misunderstands what is gets.

10 05 2011
Kramer-seinfeld

I’m sure a lot of comedians are very sensitive to the human failings they see around them everyday. They see the slip ups, the insecurities & the strange things that can happen when people attempt to communicate & interact with each other.
All you have to do is read or watch the news to see the things people get themselves into.
A comedian must have an internal lie detector. –They can smell something’s off before anyone else says anything.
They see the exaggerations and the misunderstandings. So many of these observations can make there way into their work. Their characters and stories explore & exposes the tendency for the average person to exaggerate what they have achieved & understand. But at the same time, they misunderstand what is really going on around them.
So play with exaggeration & misunderstand. Give your characters delusions of grandeur but give them a blindfold as well.

(For the comedy & Comedians series)
Note: I’m not a Comedian but I wanted to understand what makes good comedy work. So I hope this will help inspire aspiring comedians (& communicators) to develop this very creative craft.
-Your comments are very welcome.

Steve writes & coaches about Creative & Career Development
You can find Steve at: www.ineedtocreate.com
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A comedian allows their audience to be surprised by their own common sense

10 05 2011
Up-in-the-world-in-1956-s-006

To me, Comedy is a very creative art. It amazes me how agile the comic mind can be.
It’s the art of being one step ahead for the audience, but at the same time, giving the audience the idea that they are one step ahead of the character.
Comedy lets the audience sense that the character is going to slip up, yet not able to predict exactly what will happen.
The audience sees the character climbing an old ladder. The audience knows it can’t end well. They think he will just fall off, but something unexpected happens. He falls in a way no one predicted.
So allow the audience to imagine solutions before the character figures it out, But NEVER let the audience predict how he manages to escape. It’s rarely funny if the audience can predict the outcome.
Keep them surprised but give them plenty of opportunities to imagine ways to surprise themselves by their own common sense.

(For the comedy & Comedians series)
Note: I’m not a Comedian but I wanted to understand what makes good comedy work. So I hope this will help inspire aspiring comedians (& communicators) to develop this very creative craft.
-Your comments are very welcome.

Steve writes & coaches about Creative & Career Development
You can find Steve at: www.ineedtocreate.com




Your creative life is your story. Critics have their own stories.

22 04 2011
Images

Your creative life, is a life dedicated to exploring emotions, memories, observations, images, sounds, ideas and anything else that ‘s important to you. Creative people make a career from these things.
Your story is why you find these things interesting.  When we stop exploring things that interest us, we loose the very reason we started in the first place.
That gives the inner critic reason to question everything we try to do. They try to provide an alternative story. A story that tries to convince us that we don’t know why we’re doing what we are doing.
This is what an external critic does. They either don’t know your story or their try to project their own stories onto you. A critic has a mental picture about what they expect you to conform to. Of course, it’s impossible for you to match what they see in your work with their mental pictures. And so, they will criticise you for it.
This is important because you need to know that their comments are inspired by their own view or picture of the world and they’re not necessarily about you.
As long as you know your story, and your audience knows it as well, you can ignore their unfair, un-constructive or negative criticism.

(For the creative content & story telling series)
Steve writes & coaches about Creative & Career Development
You can find Steve at: www.ineedtocreate.com




Which are you… Performer? Image maker? Music maker? Or Story Teller?

20 04 2011
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There’s probably about 14,000 different job descriptions out there. Any one of those will suit you perfectly. Even if you use the process of elimination, you can spent a long time figuring out which is the best for you.
That sounds like a lot of work so I’m just going to focus on just four general areas: Performer, Image maker, Music maker & story teller.
There is some overlap with these terms, but they are distinct enough to point you in the direction that will best suit you best.
A performer is anyone who does something before an audience (For the sake of this article, is not a musician).
An image maker is anyone who create images, be it still or motion graphics.
A Music maker is anyone who creates, plays or sings music. (That isn’t primarily a sound technician).
And a Storyteller is anyone who creates and presents stories live or in a recorded form.
Each of these four categories contain a lot of different types of work.
You may well fall into one category quite easily, but becoming highly creative in your area of interest or expertise, you need to combine two or more of these areas.
For example; An image maker can create works that are far more meaningful for the audience if the image contained text that helps to convey a message or story.
Obviously a lot of music includes voice, but a song doesn’t always have a clear story.
Even when a song is part of a music video (image making), it seldom provides any visual support for a story.
So if you are a performer, Image maker or music maker, become a Story teller as well.
If you are a Performer (like a Comedian), include visual elements so what you’ll be more memorable.
Play with all the wonderful combinations, so that your creativity & your career will become more than any one form can do alone.
The most successful people have always been the best Story Tellers. What is your story?
And how are you going to express it?

(For the creative content & story telling series)
Steve writes & coaches about Creative & Career Development
You can find Steve at: www.ineedtocreate.com




What is your story?

19 04 2011
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Your story is probably one of the most important things you can ever discover about yourself. It describes where you came from. Why you do what you do. It reveals your journey. It defines your goals and your story explains why it matters.
Your story keeps you focused, and it give your audience a chance to get to know you. It helps them relate to you. It gives them reason to tell others about you.
It’s your Bio. It’s your elevator speech. It’s your introduction. It’s you in a nutshell.
It isn’t just what you do. It’s why you do it and why it gives value to others.
You are the embodiment of that story. That way, every project makes sense to you and to your fans.
If you ever walked around an Art Gallery, you may have noticed that people can spend almost as much time reading the small painting descriptions on the wall, as they do looking at the art. Because people want to know who painted it, when and what the story behind the art is.
You have a story. It’s more interesting than you think, and it grows over time, as you do. 

(For the creative content & story telling series)
Steve writes & coaches about Creative & Career Development
You can find Steve at: www.ineedtocreate.com




Some write the story of their life when they are old. Some write it in advance.

19 04 2011
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If you were asked to write the story of your life before you feel you have started to live it, would you know were to begin?
An easier question would be; If you would have written any book ever published, which book would it be, and why?
When I first asked myself that question, the first book that came into my mind was ‘The Agony and the ecstasy’, about the life of Michelagelo. Of course, he didn’t write that book, but it was about his life and work. But what still impresses me about him is his work & the dedication, scale and how prolific he was. I admire that.
If I was to write the story of what I want my life to look like, I’m not sure I could imagine doing as much as he did. But in many ways, I am write my story in advance. I have a clear vision on what I want my life to look like in the future. I want to enjoy the process of creating everything I’m doing now and in the future.
I’m writing my story in advance. Each day is another page. That’s why each day matters.
Don’t wait till you’re old to write you story. If you do, you’ll probably have little to say. Write it now and you’ll have a great story to share with the world.

(For the content & story telling series)
Steve writes & coaches about Creative & Career Development
You can find Steve at: www.ineedtocreate.com





Ownership equals Choice. Be a content creator & you own the content.

18 04 2011
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When I as a young designer, I was focused on getting all the techniques right. I read the how-to magazines and the software manuals. If I didn’t know how to do something, I would find out. I enjoyed leaning how to do new things. Everyone I knew was doing pretty much the same thing. When ever I talked to other designers, that was the things we talked about.
But I became aware that just knowing HOW to do something wasn’t enough.
I knew I didn’t own the design, I didn’t own any of it. All I had were the printouts of the work for my portfolio.
The clients would give great feedback, so I knew my designs were doing the job. But I wanted to own what I did. I wanted to create things that were from me, and I could choose where, when and why they were used.
I didn’t want to just be technically skilled. Learning new skills are very important, but I also wanted to be a Content Creator. Like a Songwriter or a Painter or a maker of wonderful things. Something I could put my name to.
So I discovered the concept that; ‘Ownership equals choice’.
So being a Content Creator gives you a lot more choices that you wouldn’t have otherwise.
Choice is a freedom. Freedom to decide which direction your life should take. What projects to pursue, what times to work & how you want your work to be used.
There’s nothing wrong with working for others, but if you want more creative freedom to choose what projects interest you, then you need to focus on YOUR content. What do you want to express? What medium do you want to use to say those things that are important to you?
If you want to have more creative control of what you do, you need to be more than skilled, you need to create your own content.

(For the content & story telling series)
Steve writes & coaches about Creative & Career Development
You can find Steve at: www.ineedtocreate.com